ICAAP 11: Meet the Delegates: Wei Tingting

[:en]Wei Tingting and Beijing Gender Health Education Institute: Experiences of the first China AIDS Walk

Wei Tingting has been working at the Beijing Gender Health Education Institute since 2011 and is currently a project manager with a focus on the China AIDS Walk (CAW).

WTT Bild 1.jpgIn 2012, China AIDS Walk organized 20 fundraising and anti-discrimination events through partnerships with universities, the LGBT community, foreign embassies and gay social clubs. 45 fundraising teams were formed and 120 people from six countries participated in the Walk. Ten celebrities supported the event via video message, social media and direct participation. Pleasure Up and Durex provided funding, and four fundraising events were organized in Beijing bars. Approximately 3,400 individuals donated to China AIDS Walk and it received media attention in the Chinese and foreign press. Several foreign embassies, international organizations and community-based organizations actively supported CAW. Walkers raised 164,705 RMB (roughly $27,000 USD). Funds facilitated access to antiretroviral treatment for impoverished PLHA, and supported initiatives by a local HIV/AIDS community based organizations.

Wei Tingting presented on integration of different resources including celebrities, media, businesses and non-profit sector through collaboration based on clear communication of needs and expectations. She highlighted that the project was not a simple fundraising event, but a project to educate the public in tolerance and non-discrimination, while giving prominent exposure to the local LGBT population as a positive force.

This piece is the fourth in a series introducing you to the partners that Asia Catalyst is supporting through scholarships, strategy and translation to attend the 11th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific. The Congress brought together over 4,000 delegates from 22 countries in the region in Bangkok this month.

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Wei
Tingting and Beijing Gender Health Education Institute: Experiences of the
first China AIDS Walk

Wei Tingting has been working at the Beijing Gender
Health Education Institute since 2011 and is currently a project manager with a
focus on the China AIDS Walk (CAW).

WTT Bild 1.jpgIn 2012, China AIDS Walk organized 20 fundraising
and anti-discrimination events through partnerships with universities, the LGBT
community, foreign embassies and gay social clubs. 45 fundraising teams were
formed and 120 people from six countries participated in the Walk. Ten
celebrities supported the event via video message, social media and direct
participation. Pleasure Up and Durex provided funding, and four fundraising
events were organized in Beijing bars. Approximately 3,400 individuals donated
to China AIDS Walk and it received media attention in the Chinese and foreign
press. Several foreign embassies, international organizations and
community-based organizations actively supported CAW. Walkers raised 164,705
RMB (roughly $27,000 USD). Funds facilitated access to antiretroviral treatment
for impoverished PLHA, and supported initiatives by a local HIV/AIDS community
based organizations.

Wei Tingting presented on integration of different
resources including celebrities, media, businesses and non-profit sector
through collaboration based on clear communication of needs and expectations.
She highlighted that the project was not a simple fundraising event, but a
project to educate the public in tolerance and non-discrimination, while giving
prominent exposure to the local LGBT population as a positive force.

This
piece is the fourth in a series introducing you to the partners that Asia
Catalyst is supporting through scholarships, strategy and translation to attend
the 11th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific.  The Congress brought together over 4,000
delegates from 22 countries in the region in Bangkok this month
.

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ICAAP 11: Meet the Delegates: Wang Baoyi

[:en]Wang Baoyi and the China HIV/AIDS Community-based Organization Network: Fighting discrimination against People living with HIV/AIDS in China

People living with HIV/AIDS  in China face wide-spread discrimination in health care settings. Though Prime Minister Li Keqiang recently publicly expressed support for PLHA, in early 2013 a patient in Tianjin had to remove his HIV positive status from his medical records before he could undergo life-saving surgery. This illustrates failure to address medical discrimination on a systemic level.

Wang Baoyi.jpgWang Baoyi is the secretariat for the China HIV/AIDS Community-based Organization Network. The CBO network is the largest network of community based HIV/AIDS organizations in China and counts among its members organizations of sex workers, men who have sex with men, and people living with HIV/AIDS and hemophilia. In China, discrimination in health care setting has become one of the major barriers that prevent People living with HIV/AIDS from accessing universal, life-saving medical service.

A main initiative of the CBO Network is fighting medical discrimination. In its course of work, the CBO Network has organized training workshops for organizations in Henan and Hebei Provinces, and launched an initiative highlighting doctors willing to treat people living with HIV, the “Sunshine Doctors.”  Baoyi took part in a roundtable discussion on medical discrimination and gave an oral presentation titled “The Role of Community-based Organizations in Fighting Medical Discrimination against People Living with HIV/AIDS in China” at a general assembly titled “Understanding and Eliminating Stigma and Discrimination in Healthcare Settings.”

This piece is the third in a series introducing you to the partners that Asia Catalyst is supporting through scholarships, strategy and translation to attend the 11th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific. The Congress brought together over 4,000 delegates from 22 countries in the region in Bangkok this month.[:zh]Wang Baoyi and the China HIV/AIDS
Community-based Organization Network: Fighting discrimination against People
living with HIV/AIDS in China

People living with HIV/AIDS  in China face wide-spread discrimination in
health care settings. Though Prime Minister Li Keqiang recently publicly
expressed support for PLHA, in early 2013 a patient in Tianjin had to remove
his HIV positive status from his medical records before he could undergo
life-saving surgery. This illustrates failure to address medical discrimination
on a systemic level.

Wang Baoyi.jpgWang Baoyi is the secretariat for
the China HIV/AIDS
Community-based Organization Network.
The
CBO network is the largest network of community based HIV/AIDS organizations in
China and counts among its members organizations of sex workers, men who have
sex with men, and people living with HIV/AIDS and hemophilia. In China,
discrimination in health care setting has become one of the major barriers that
prevent People living with HIV/AIDS from accessing universal, life-saving medical
service.

 A main initiative of
the CBO Network is fighting medical discrimination. In its course of work, the CBO Network has
organized training workshops for organizations in Henan and Hebei Provinces,
and launched an initiative highlighting doctors willing to treat people living
with HIV, the “Sunshine Doctors.”  Baoyi
took part in a roundtable
discussion on medical discrimination and gave an oral presentation titled “The Role of
Community-based Organizations in Fighting Medical Discrimination against People
Living with HIV/AIDS in China” at
a general assembly titled “Understanding and
Eliminating Stigma and Discrimination in Healthcare Settings.”

This piece is the third in a series introducing you to the
partners that Asia Catalyst is supporting through scholarships, strategy and
translation to attend the 11th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the
Pacific.  The Congress brought together
over 4,000 delegates from 22 countries in the region in Bangkok this month.


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ICAAP11: Meet the Delegates: Lanlan

[:en]Continuing the Fight for Acceptance of Female Sex Workers in China

“我们是有益的,没有害处。只要社会不歧视我们,法律不惩处我们,我们就过得很幸福。”

“We [sex workers] are doing something beneficial for others, not harmful. As long as society does not discriminate against us, and the law does not punish us, we will lead a happy life.”

Lanlan, a founding member and executive director of Xin’ Ai was born in 1978, a time of great economic change for China. After dropping out of school at thirteen, she tried her hand at farming and eventually found work in a restaurant, chopping vegetables and washing dishes. In 2000, after the birth of her daughter, Lanlan turned to sex work to support her child and aging parents.

Lanlan.jpgFounded in 2008 to work toward the decriminalization of the sex trade, and prevent violence and discrimination against sex workers, the organization, also provides violence prevention training, training  in persuading customers to use condoms, health, legal and human rights training, HIV/STI blood testing, and medical referrals.

Lanlan was motivated to start a sex worker support group when she began to feel, as she says, that “AIDS NGO staff could not relate to sex workers or their particular needs.” Today, Xin’ Ai conducts outreach to sex workers, providing them with occupational safety training, health training, and legal training. The mission, says Lanlan, is self-confidence, self-respect, and mutual support.

Lanlan wants to know more about overall international strategies for AIDS prevention as well as ways of international funding for AIDS prevention in China. At ICAAP Lanlan gave an oral presentation about her work at Xin’ Ai and took part in a roundtable discussion on female sex work and presented a video on sex work in the Asia Pacific Village.

This piece is the first in a series introducing you to the partners that Asia Catalyst is supporting through scholarships, strategy and translation to attend the 11th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific.  The Congress brought together over 4,000 delegates from 22 countries in the region in Bangkok this month.[:zh]

Continuing the Fight for Acceptance
of Female Sex Workers in China

“我们是有益的,没有害处。只要社会不歧视我们,法律不惩处我们,我们就过得很幸福。”

“We
[sex workers] are doing something beneficial for others, not harmful. As long
as society does not discriminate against us, and the law does not punish us, we
will lead a happy life.”

Lanlan,
a founding member and executive director of Xin’ Ai was born in 1978, a time of
great economic change for China. After dropping out of school at thirteen, she
tried her hand at farming and eventually found work in a restaurant, chopping
vegetables and washing dishes. In 2000, after the birth of her daughter, Lanlan
turned to sex work to support her child and aging parents.

Lanlan.jpgFounded in 2008 to work toward the
decriminalization of the sex trade, and prevent violence and discrimination
against sex workers, the organization, also provides violence prevention training, training  in persuading customers
to use condoms, health, legal and
human rights training, HIV/STI
blood testing, and medical
referrals.

Lanlan was motivated to start a sex worker support group
when she began to feel, as she says, that “AIDS NGO staff could not relate
to sex workers or their particular needs.” Today, Xin’ Ai conducts
outreach to sex workers, providing them with occupational safety training,
health training, and legal training. The mission, says Lanlan, is
self-confidence, self-respect, and mutual support.

Lanlan
wants to know more about overall international strategies for AIDS prevention
as well as ways of international funding for AIDS prevention in China. At ICAAP Lanlan gave an oral
presentation about her work at Xin’ Ai and took part in a roundtable discussion
on female sex work and presented a video on sex work in the Asia Pacific
Village.

This piece is the first in a series introducing you to the
partners that Asia Catalyst is supporting through scholarships, strategy and
translation to attend the 11th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the
Pacific.  The Congress brought together
over 4,000 delegates from 22 countries in the region in Bangkok this month.

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Asia Catalyst and Partner Organizations to Participate in ICAAP11

[:en]medres-icaap-11-logo.jpgBy Annika Schaefer

From November 18th to 22nd Asia Catalyst staff and delegates from four Chinese partner organizations will gather with other advocates from the region at the 11th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific (ICCAP). Delegates will present their work, meet with advocacy targets, and attend community and scientific sessions.  The congress, to be held in Bangkok, Thailand, is the largest forum on HIV/AIDS in the Asia-Pacific region.

Among the expected 4,000 delegates from 22 countries across Asia and the Pacific engaging in ICAAP11, Asia Catalyst staff and partners will each have the opportunity to share best practices and present on their organization’s work, program results, and lessons learned for the future, in the form of abstract presentations, poster presentations, roundtables, and other side events.

Asia Catalyst is supporting members from the four selected Chinese partner organizations with English translation, scholarship assistance, and the coordination of meetings, roundtables and presentations.

Delegates receiving our support were selected by an open application process from organizations we have worked with in the past.  Three members of the delegation are graduate organizations of the Asia Catalyst NGO Leadership Cohort, a year-long organizational management training program for grassroots health rights advocates in China, and several have been working with Asia Catalyst’s Advocacy program.

Asia Catalyst will have a booth in the Asia Pacific Village, an area of the conference that is open to the public for free, and which is geared toward networking, information sharing and joint actions for community based organizations.  The booth will showcase advocacy projects
from partner organizations around the region, including several from the Rights Training Program’s regional network.  It will also showcase Asia Catalyst materials and training programs, and serve as a platform for expanding our network in the region.

Over the coming weeks, we will feature profiles of advocates and their projects on the blog.

Please support our efforts to bring advocates together by making a tax-deductible donation  to Asia Catalyst.[:zh]medres-icaap-11-logo.jpgBy Annika Schaefer

From November 18th to 22nd Asia
Catalyst staff and delegates from four Chinese partner organizations will
gather with other advocates from the region at the 11th International Congress
on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific (ICCAP). Delegates will present their work,
meet with advocacy targets, and attend community and scientific sessions.  The congress, to be held in Bangkok,
Thailand, is the largest forum on HIV/AIDS in the Asia-Pacific region.

Among the expected 4,000
delegates from 22 countries across Asia and the Pacific engaging in ICAAP11,
Asia Catalyst staff and partners will each have the opportunity to share best
practices and present on their organization’s work, program results, and
lessons learned for the future, in the form of abstract presentations, poster
presentations, roundtables, and other side events.

Asia Catalyst is supporting
members from the four selected Chinese partner organizations with English
translation, scholarship assistance, and the coordination of meetings, roundtables
and presentations.

Delegates receiving our support
were selected by an open application process from organizations we have worked
with in the past.  Three members of the
delegation are graduate organizations of the Asia Catalyst NGO Leadership
Cohort, a year-long organizational management training program for grassroots
health rights advocates in China, and several have been working with Asia
Catalyst’s Advocacy program.

Asia Catalyst will have a booth
in the Asia Pacific Village, an area of the conference that is open to the
public for free, and which is geared toward networking, information sharing and
joint actions for community based organizations.  The booth will showcase advocacy projects
from partner organizations around the region, including several from the Rights
Training Program’s regional network.  It
will also showcase Asia Catalyst materials and training programs, and serve as
a platform for expanding our network in the region.

Over the coming weeks, we will
feature profiles of advocates and their projects on the blog.

Please support our efforts to
bring advocates together by making a tax-deductible donation  to Asia Catalyst.

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国际不再恐同日,跨性别纪录片《兄弟》首映 – Beijing IDAHO Event Increases Transgender Visibility in China with the Premiere of the Documentary “Brothers”

[:en]Beijing IDAHO Event Increases Transgender Visibility in China with the Premiere of the  Documentary “Brothers”

On 17 May 2013, the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHO), several Beijing LGBT organizations including Queer Comrades, the Aibai Culture & Education Center, the Beijing Gender Health Education Institute and Common Language worked together with the Netherlands Embassy in Beijing to hold the event “lgbT – Increasing Transgender Visbility in China”. More than 80 people, including media representatives, educational professionals, mental health workers and civil society volunteers, got together to watch the premiere of the transgender documentary “Brothers” and talked about the most pressing transgender issues in China.

Full text of the English and Chinese press release for “Brothers” is below. (more…)